Feeding your family like our own

Posts tagged “Beef

Fire Up the BBQ

good burger
Then as you take your first bite the burger explodes with flavor and a small bit of juice escapes onto your chin.
Yes…BBQ season is back, despite Mother Nature. Our calendars say it is so!
So to have this mouth watering experience in the picture you must visit http://www.richmondstation.ca, or the restaurant and order chef Carl Heinrick’s signature burger. In the meantime fire up the Barbie!
Here at Dingo Farms we are extremists with the grill, we grill year-round. We don’t mind bundling up in front of the grill many nights a week to inorder to savour the flavor.
To add to your grilling pleasure we are pleased to offer our new BBQ griller package of pork and beef. Just a nice sampler of steak, porkchops, sausage and burger. But don’t stop there, shake it up a little this season and try a ½ ground pork/ ½ ground beef burger for a juicy twist. Better yet if you’ve never tried fresh Ontario Lamb see what a ½ ground lamb / ½ ground beef burger chef’s up like. Surprise the kids; they might surprise you by liking it. Toss in some Dingo spice (recipe available on http://www.facebook.com/dingofarms) or free at our store, and enjoy a new flavor experience.
Our personal favorite way to grill these burgers is to get the grill good and hot, sear the burger 3-4 minutes per side (resist the urge to flatten the burger and squish all that good juice out!). Then lower the temp of the BBQ to medium and cook to desired doneness, experts say internal temp. of 170°. We enjoy our Traeger Smoker (www.traegercanada.com) but it works equally as well on a propane grill such as napoleon (www.napoleongrills.com). For those foodie’s in the know wanting the ultimate experience I hear that the Big Green Egg grill is killer! (www.Biggreenegg.ca ).
As always safety first when resurrecting the BBQ from the depths of its winter hideaway. For tips on getting your bbq ready to grill visit http://www.toronto.ca/fire/prevention/safebarbecuing.htm.
If convenience is more your thing our boxed burgers are back in convenient small 3lb boxes ready for the grill. Perhaps a juicy new “Filler-Free” Sausage is in order for a quick lunch or dinner? That’s right “filler-free” means nothing but meat. Try swapping a “hot dog” out for a Filler Free sausage for those hard to please, yet to be foodies?
A little tired of the “let’s just have pizza tonight” line? Make it a family cook night. Make your own pizza using Dingo Farms selection of cured meats, pepperoni, keilbassa, summer sausage or smoked sausages. Oh and don’t forget your favorite veggies!
Make your own dough in a bread maker or use a prepared flat bread/pita or prepared crust, add your favorite toppings and use a pizza stone on the BBQ!
Too much right? My excitement for BBQ is taking over, while writing this, if you couldn’t tell.
Check out this site for step by step how-to’s with Chef Jamie Oliver (http://www.jamieoliver.vom/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=245743)
Since it’s easier and economical to plan meals with some stock in the freezer, check out our beef and pork packages. Sample a variety of cuts at a great price. Watch our facebook for our favorite BBQ recipes using cuts from the packages.
So visit us at http://www.facebook.com/dingofarms for great ideas, recipes, offers and promotions and just to hear what exciting is going on at the farm.
To get you started today check out the amazing marinade below.
An amazing marinade
• 1/3 cup soy sauce,
• 1/2 cup olive oil,
• 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice,
• 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce,
• 1 1/2 tbsp garlic powder,
• 6 tbsp fresh basil chopped fine OR 3 tbsp dried basil,
• ½ cup fresh parsley chopped fine OR 1 1/2 tbsp dried parsley flakes,
• 1 tsp ground pepper,
• 1 tsp minced garlic

Advertisements

Honest Goodness? Click on the images to see the sales pitch

ani•trite noun \ˈnī-ˌtrīt\ 1: a salt or ester of NITROUS acid

hon•est
adjective \ˈä-nəst\
1: free from fraud or deception: legitimate, truthful, genuine, real, humble, and plain
2: reputable, respectable, good, worthy
3: creditable, praiseworthy
4: marked by integrity
: marked by free, forthright, and sincere expression

trans•par•ent
adjective \tran(t)s-ˈper-ənt\
1: fine or sheer enough to be seen through
2: free from pretence or deceit
3: easily detected or seen through, readily understood
4: characterized by visibility or accessibility of information especially concerning business practices

I think we all understand the purpose of dramatic packaging (marketing, marketing marketing). The graphics, the wording, it all plays a key part in selling a product or service. There are even people out there whose soul job is market evaluation and making a product more saleable then the competition. They even hold focus groups that rate everything from a products name and colouring on the package to the font used and logo design. It’s important I get it, but all the hype and strategy shouldn’t deceive the consumer about the product inside.
So I was very curious when my youngest and I were out shopping recently and he came across some beef jerky that he just had have. The front label touted the key word “clean” and the back label clearly stated it was “organic grass fed beef jerky with no Nitrites added”
Now “Z” is a beef jerky connboisseur and has made beef jerky his snack of choice since he was about a year and a half old. I am concerned as all moms are about what is in the products that I feed my kids, especially the ones that they want to eat all the time. I stand behind the products that Dingo Farms produces and I know there is a small amount of nitrites in Dingo Farms Beef Jerky….there has to be, the nitrites give the product some shelf life and more importantly prevent the formation of botulism. It does add somewhat to the flavouring as well because it is basically salt. Now as I read the back of the package there was one item on the ingredients list that immediately caught my attention “cultured celery powder” Now here is the thing; celery as a fresh vegetable has one of the highest naturally occurring nitrate numbers out there as are spinach, beets, radishes and cabbages. Surprised?, I was when I started reading. On an average 10 % of our nitrite exposure is from cured meats and 90% naturally occurring from vegetables. Now don’t panic, you don’t have to live on nuts, fruit and beer, remember moderation and awareness!. So what happens to those naturally occurring nitrates when you process cultured celery to a powder? Because I am not a chemist I came home and researched, in fact I invite you to do the same.

What I found in my opinion is a clear lack of transparency and honesty by any  Marketing team  or producer  who markets their product under the guise of natural, nitrate free, nitrite free and no preservatives when in fact the cultured celery powder is a nitrate and acts as a preservative (and is equally harmful).  It does what sodium nitrites have done for years under the pretence that it is a healthier alternative when in fact it isn’t.  For the most part the nitrates in cultured celery powered tend to be far more concentrated then the amount used in our beef jerky. And if you continue reading most sources say nitrites are not the health risk they are made out to be if they like everything out there are consumed in moderation.  Bananas are a healthy snack and a great source of many vitamins and nutrients the body can benefit from but a diet rich in bananas would be a diet high in potassium and too much potassium can lead to heart damage and cardiac arrest. Get what I am saying?c

While manufactures seemingly make it easy to make the right choices food wise, really the onus is on the consumer to read and understand  (and continually educate themselves) and sadly when I did ask at the store no one was able to refute the misleading packaging on the beef jerky “Z” was hoping to eat.  So I wanted to compare this premium product with a product I already know and love and here is what I found…

The beef jerky in the store was marketing itself as a premium product worth a premium price.  The “nitrite free beef jerky” was almost $3.00 more for a portion that was considerably smaller then the beef jerky sold at Dingo Farms even though they were the same by weight. It was bloated with oil and gummy rather then that well cured (dryer) texture I prefer. Not to mention the over the top packaging some market genius  thought of (does not scream sustainable to me).  I admit the packaging of the Dingo Farms beef jerky isn’t pretty, but we are working on that, but I can promise when we do pretty it up, it won’t be excessive. The products at Dingo Farms along with the packaging are genuine and well thought through.  We prefer the product to speak for itself and our ingredients are honest and transparent. What does our Beef Jerky package say? Naturally grown beef and minimal nitrites.

Now if you truly want to know what is in your beef jerky, come grab a round roast and  then pop over to our Facebook  and look in our recipe folder for our homemade beef jerky recipe. You’ll see it still has the salt, but at least you can choose.

Here are some links that we found enlightening                                                                  http://www.good.is/posts/your-nitrite-free-meats-are-full-of-nitrites/  http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/nutrition/DJ0974.html        http://ruhlman.com/2011/05/the-no-nitrites-added-hoax/          http://m.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/ottawa-mulls-new-labelling-rules-for-natural-deli-meats/article558784/?service=mobile  


Comfort Food, for your tummy and your wallet

With Old Man Winter making one last attempt to chill us to the bone I’m drawn back into my kitchen with thoughts of comfort food… warm and soothing there is nothing like old fashioned soup or stew to warm you to the bone. Normally I would agree and post one of my favourite homemade soup recipes but not today. Remember we are trying to inspiring you?  So today I’m giving you a favourite of mine, quick and simple with an Asian twist, this delicious number will fill tummy’s and impress.

One of the points of choosing this recipe is that it can be prepared with any one of a number of inexpensive cuts of beef and no one will be the wiser.  I use stewing beef because I always have some in the freezer but you can try flank or blade cuts too. Each will add a slightly different texture and taste to the dish. The secret to using these cuts however is in the prep.

As I mentioned last week we are always eager to help you make the most of your meat. By asking and understanding different cuts of beef and how prep and marinades will compliment the meats you will easily be able to feed your family healthy meat dishes without breaking your grocery budget. And by becoming familiar with these less common cuts you will be more inspired to venture further out of the big box and farther down the farm laneway (we’ll have you trying liver before you know it)

Speaking of the farm laneway, we are excited to announce our farm store will be opening in the end of May, this will allow you to truly see and understand where your meat is coming from. So watch here and on Facebook for updates.

Beef and Broccoli

  • 3/4 pound beef  ( I usually use stewing beef)
  • 1 large bunch broccoli, cut into florets
  • 1/3  cup oyster sauce (I know this may not be a standard in your pantry but grab a bottle, it’s handy)
  • 2 teaspoons light olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more if needed
  • 1 thin slice of fresh ginger root
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped fine
  • 2 large red peppers chopped large
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds toasted (optional)
  • Whole grain brown rice cooked as directed

Directions

  1. Whisk together the oyster sauce, olive oil, soy sauce, sugar, and cornstarch in a bowl, and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Place the beef pieces into a shallow bowl, pour the oyster sauce mixture over the meat, stir to coat well, and marinate for at least 30 minutes in refrigerator.
  2. Heat olive oil in a skillet or pan over medium-high heat, and stir in the ginger and garlic. Let them sizzle in the hot oil for about 1 minute to flavour the oil, then remove ginger and discard. Stir in the broccoli and peppers, and toss and stir in the hot oil until bright green and almost tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove the broccoli and peppers from the pan, and set aside.
  3. Pour a little more oil into the pan if needed, and stir and toss the beef with the marinade until the sauce forms a glaze on the beef, and the meat is no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Return the cooked broccoli to the pan, and stir until the meat and broccoli are heated through, about 3 minutes.
  4. Serve over rice and sprinkle with sesame seeds